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  • #16
    I prefer Nascar on TV these days, but only watch the Daytona 500 from start to finish. The rest of the schedule (when I am not at the dirt track) I usually have it on, but only check the progress of some drivers, just not engrossed in it. I don't enjoy the competition or the stage racing these days. We used to go to Michigan every year, but it just got to expensive! I can watch it on TV for alot less and with the level of excitement that Nascar is today I prefer not to spend much on it. The dirt track has more excitement in an hour than Nascar has all day. JMHO
    2019 Race Counter - Total 7 + (rainouts- 7) Attica-2, Eldora-3, Fremont-1, Waynesfield- 1


    2018 Race Counter - Total- 33 + (Rainouts-18) Atomic-2, Attica-7, Eldora-11, Fremont-3, Kokomo-1, Limaland-2, Mansfield- 2, Waynesfield-4, Wayne County-1

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    • #17
      It is estimated that there were only 30 to 40K in attendance at Bristol last weekend. The place holds over 160K. It used to be one of the toughest tickets in Nascar. My, how the mighty have fallen. Its pretty obvious people are watching at home or not watching at all anymore.

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      • #18
        I cannot develop an emotional connection with the current crop of NASCAR drivers and have not watched a NASCAR race on TV since the Daytona 500. The new fans who jumped on the NASCAR bandwagon 15 years ago moved on and the old rednecks like me dropped out. I can do a whole season of dirt racing for less money than it costs to attend one NASCAR event. Couple that with the fact that I do have an emotional connection with the local speedways and its unlikely NASCAR can do anything to recapture my interest.

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        • #19
          I started losing my "passion" for Nascar when they went to the chase or playoff format. Makes no sense. You compete against each other week after week who ever scores the most points from Daytona to the end wins. Wasn't that complicated.

          Then it basically became about what drivers or drivers dad had money we're the ones who got rides. Nascar used to be the top drivers in the country competing against each other. Now it's about who has the most money and wants to spend it

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Sprint14 View Post
            I started losing my "passion" for Nascar when they went to the chase or playoff format. Makes no sense. You compete against each other week after week who ever scores the most points from Daytona to the end wins. Wasn't that complicated.

            Then it basically became about what drivers or drivers dad had money we're the ones who got rides. Nascar used to be the top drivers in the country competing against each other. Now it's about who has the most money and wants to spend it
            I understand the stage racing to a point because a lot of people would watch the start of the race, fade off, and then come back at the end. The stages are suppose to make it "racing" throughout the event instead of just riding around for 350 miles and then get back to racing the last 50 miles. To much plays into stage racing for my liking where if half the field pits right before the stage can get you a stage win not because you was good or fast, but simply because you stayed out.

            They tried to make it more exciting by the playoff format which I understand to a point because they lose a lot of interest if the points is spread way out and nobody competing for the top spots. Also throw in college football/NFL football starting up and through the end of the Nascar season puts a damper on the end of the year for some fans and I am sure ratings. In some ways I like the playoff format because it gives teams/drivers a chance, but in another way I don't feel that a 10th place team or worse could win the championship simply because he got hot at the right time. Now points don't even really matter except for maybe a few spots, but winning a race basically guarantees you in the playoffs and how you run the rest of the year doesn't matter such as the case of Austin Dillion last year. I believe it backfired on them and it might make for more exciting racing at the end of the year, but loses the entire process of being consistent throughout the year and winning the championship by being the best the entire year.

            I still watch Nascar, but not a die-hard like before. If something better is on or if I got things to do whether outside or whatever I am doing them where before I set my schedule around the Nascar schedule and watched the races completely. Now I mostly watch to see how Larson, Blaney, Stenhouse, and soon to be Bell.

            Indy Car is making a small push back now which they had similar issues in the past where you needed the big money/sponsor or had to know somebody to get a ride back in the day. It is still that way for the most part, but you see some teams/drivers get a chance because of talent. I don't think that will ever change no matter the form of racing because usually if you have money or it is attached to you your likely going to get a ride over somebody who doesn't even though might not be as talented.
            Last edited by DirtRacer42; April 14th, 2019, 06:52 AM.
            2019 Race Counter: 7
            All-Stars: 5
            World of Outlaws: 2
            Tracks: Bubba (3), Volusia (4).
            Rain: 1

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            • #21
              I lost interest in IndyCar when the rear fenders appeared. Fenders on an open wheel car are like training wheels on a bicycle. They make it safe for beginners. IndyCar's training wheels should abandoned. To do that, IndyCar needs better drivers. IndyCar also needs to find a way for dirt racing to once again be the path to the 500. I have an idea for that, but that's for another thread.

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              • #22
                To do that, IndyCar needs better drivers. IndyCar also needs to find a way for dirt racing to once again be the path to the 500. I have an idea for that, but that's for another thread.[/QUOTE]

                That's the problem tho,the kids coming up in dirt now would rather go napcar route than indy.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by racemak View Post
                  I lost interest in IndyCar when the rear fenders appeared. Fenders on an open wheel car are like training wheels on a bicycle. They make it safe for beginners. IndyCar's training wheels should abandoned. To do that, IndyCar needs better drivers. IndyCar also needs to find a way for dirt racing to once again be the path to the 500. I have an idea for that, but that's for another thread.
                  The fenders were taken off when the cars were updated for 2018. The IndyCar series schedule seems a lot like it was back before the split, which I think is part of the series' resurgence. The ride-buying and path for dirt racers are another story.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DirtRacer42 View Post

                    I understand the stage racing to a point because a lot of people would watch the start of the race, fade off, and then come back at the end. The stages are suppose to make it "racing" throughout the event instead of just riding around for 350 miles and then get back to racing the last 50 miles. To much plays into stage racing for my liking where if half the field pits right before the stage can get you a stage win not because you was good or fast, but simply because you stayed out.

                    They tried to make it more exciting by the playoff format which I understand to a point because they lose a lot of interest if the points is spread way out and nobody competing for the top spots. Also throw in college football/NFL football starting up and through the end of the Nascar season puts a damper on the end of the year for some fans and I am sure ratings. In some ways I like the playoff format because it gives teams/drivers a chance, but in another way I don't feel that a 10th place team or worse could win the championship simply because he got hot at the right time. Now points don't even really matter except for maybe a few spots, but winning a race basically guarantees you in the playoffs and how you run the rest of the year doesn't matter such as the case of Austin Dillion last year. I believe it backfired on them and it might make for more exciting racing at the end of the year, but loses the entire process of being consistent throughout the year and winning the championship by being the best the entire year.

                    I still watch Nascar, but not a die-hard like before. If something better is on or if I got things to do whether outside or whatever I am doing them where before I set my schedule around the Nascar schedule and watched the races completely. Now I mostly watch to see how Larson, Blaney, Stenhouse, and soon to be Bell.

                    Indy Car is making a small push back now which they had similar issues in the past where you needed the big money/sponsor or had to know somebody to get a ride back in the day. It is still that way for the most part, but you see some teams/drivers get a chance because of talent. I don't think that will ever change no matter the form of racing because usually if you have money or it is attached to you your likely going to get a ride over somebody who doesn't even though might not be as talented.
                    When the playoff/chase format came out it was 2004. T.v ratings were still going up attendance was going up, there was no reason to change it. Roger Penske and a few others just cried because his driver won 7 races & Matt Kenseth won 1, but what he failed to see is his driver only finished ahead of Kenseth 9-10 times which 7 of those were wins. Of those wins I think Newman only finished 2-3 spots ahead of Kenseth. Plus up until that point, 50+ years only twice did the champ win only 1 race. In most cases the champion was in the top 3 in wins & consistency is what separated everyone which it should. The format was simple basic math. Higher you finish, more points you get, most points = champion, bonus points for leading/leading most.

                    What you have now with the chase/playoff/stages/10 debris cautions a race/restart inside 10 laps to go almost guaranteed, is manufactured competition. What they did was make the racing revolve around the sponsorships & tv instead of the sponsors & tv revolve around the racing. The new cars great for safety, terrible for racing. YouTube races from 1990-2000. The racing and battle for positions is way better & closer even on the 1.5 miles. The product is just terrible now. I was watching for Larson but then when I saw multiple races end with debris cautions inside 10 to go I gave up

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                    • #25
                      You raised an interesting question, Sprint14. Do the commercials exist because of the race, or does the race exist because of the commercials? I think NASCAR drivers are chosen for their public speaking ability, not driving talent. Listen to NASCAR drivers talk. They're salesmen.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by racemak View Post
                        You raised an interesting question, Sprint14. Do the commercials exist because of the race, or does the race exist because of the commercials? I think NASCAR drivers are chosen for their public speaking ability, not driving talent. Listen to NASCAR drivers talk. They're salesmen.
                        “Yeah I had a real good *insert sponsor, make and model of car* gotta thank the guys back at the shop. Thought we had a real chance to win today before the *insert car #* came down on me”

                        Every single wrecked out driver.
                        2019 Race Counter: 8
                        Attica (3), Butler (1), Fremont (2), Lawrenceburg (1), Wayne Co. (1)

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                        • #27
                          Gimmicks like race stages and schedule juggling won't help fans develop an emotional investment in NASCAR racing. NASCAR is circling the drain and it appears it's leaders don't even know it.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by racemak View Post
                            You raised an interesting question, Sprint14. Do the commercials exist because of the race, or does the race exist because of the commercials? I think NASCAR drivers are chosen for their public speaking ability, not driving talent. Listen to NASCAR drivers talk. They're salesmen.
                            Anymore the drivers are chosen based on how much money/sponsorship they bring. Which in a way public speaking/salesmanship and just the ability to control a car is all they need. Being a racing junkie that I am, I'll follow asphalt late models and read/watch things on speed51. Just in super late models they talk about drivers finding sponsorship to buy rides and the price is insane.

                            Sadly I don't directly blame Nascar for this. It is the fault of the owners like Rick Hendrick, Jack Roush, Joe Gibbs, Roger Penske, Richard Children's, etc. They figured out ways to profit off of sponsorship alone and racing became almost secondary income. Yes it's needed, but they priced themselves completely out of the market. I forget the exact numbers but one article stated a sponsorship back in 2000 2003 would only get you a fraction of races today. Inflation has some to do with this, but when they figured out I can have two companies sponsor 1 car primarily and make more money. Then you add in multiple teams but forget the fact you have to employ people for those teams & maintain equipment, it cuts into profit.

                            Then you get to the part where the suits just focus on the $$$ and getting the sponsors & tone the racing to what the sponsors want, you get a perfect storm for disaster. Like I said, watch a race from 1990-2005ish and you will see how much better the racing is, then it starts going down. Around the Brian France era when they decided to try to "sale" people on the sport instead of the sport "selling" itself. Kind of the way it had done to get to the popularity level it got too. But you want to ruin something, just add suits

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                            • #29
                              Im surprised how many die hard Nascar fans that I know just no longer attend or watch the races. They may turn in to see where a few of the drivers like Blaney, Larson, and such are but they often just look at results.

                              I havent turned on a tv to watch Nascar for quite a few years and I was never a hard core fan to begin with.

                              Im seeing lots of Nascar collectible stuff being dropped at thrift stores or listed for sale.

                              The interest just is not there anymore.



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